Non-Profit Partners messages about COVID-19

COVID19 Has Changed Life as We Knew It

By Jane L. Delgado, Ph.D., MS, President and CEO, National Alliance for Hispanic Health (the Alliance).

These past few months have been extraordinary. What began as news about a few people far away getting a respiratory condition, is now a pandemic that has touched every aspect of our daily life. So, what are we as Latinas to do in this most upending of times? Our tendency is to do what we always do — get the task done and plow forward. And while that may have gotten us through a lot of the naturally occurring turbulence of life, COVID19 has disrupted our way of life now and the way we will live in the future.

More than ever we need to stay informed. It is essential that we rely on reputable sources of information for the best science and its applicability to our life. And while optimism is essential to get through difficult moments; false hopes, false cures, as well as false fears only make a difficult situation worse.

Our Values are Greater than Any Virus

By Raquel Tamez, Chief Executive Officer
SHPE: Leading Hispanics in STEM

Whenever I’m asked to talk about the Hispanic community, a few words almost always come up. One of them is resilience.

Through war and conquest, pandemics and political upheavals, Hispanics have defined what it means to be resilient. Now, as we confront the biggest global challenge in a generation in COVID-19, our community—indeed, the whole of humanity—is once again being put to the test.

For my organization, the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE), the crisis is already hitting home. We’ve had to cancel four of our seven Regional Leadership Development Conferences. Chapter meetings are being put on hold. Our entire national team is working remotely.

 
 

COVID-19: Unprecedented Moments Provide Opportunities to Redefine and Shape Collaboration

By Sindy M. Benavidez. LULAC National Chief Executive Officer

Today, we are witnessing an unprecedented moment in modern history as our nation and the world confront coronavirus (COVID-19), a health menace that threatens all of us. Mine is both the privilege and the responsibility of being on the frontline daily of this battle, as the first woman CEO to lead the oldest and largest Latino civil rights organization in the country, the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). With that role comes the solemn realization that I am making critical decisions on issues impacting 58-million Latinos in the United States. As a grassroots organization, it is our unique infrastructure of volunteer members that is our biggest asset. One of the most important roles I am actively exercising daily is a trait that I learned in my first career as Deputy Director of Constituent Services for Governor Tim Kaine: listening to the needs of my community and taking immediate action.